Zurück zum Inhaltsverzeichnis von Coleman über Parker        

 

Charlie Parker: Perhaps (Take 1)

 

Track: Perhaps (Take 1)

 

Artist: Charlie Parker (alto sax)

 

CD: Complete Savoy & Dial Studio Sessions

(Savoy 17079)

 

 

Musicians: Charlie Parker (alto sax), Miles Davis (trumpet), John Lewis (piano), Curly Russell (bass), Max Roach (drums).

Composed by Charlie Parker.

 

Recorded: New York, September 24 1948

 

 

This composition is another example of the many linguistic rhythmic devices Parker used in his music that are not much discussed. In my opinion, the composed melody is clearly an explanation with variations. The opening phrase of the melody is an explanation of some kind, followed by but perhaps (going into measure 5), which begins the first alternate explanation. Then perhaps (into measure 7) begins a second alternate explanation. Perhaps (into measure 9) begins the final clarification, then the melody ends with the responses in measures 11 and 12—perhaps, perhaps, perhaps. Therefore we can think of the melodic segments in between the perhaps as some sort of discussion and clarification of a particular situation, lending more evidence to the literal admonishment of the cats to always tell a story with your music. Obviously in this song there is an added onomatopoetic dimension to the melody that allowed me to at least recognize the perhaps musical phrase at an early stage in my career when I knew very little about the structure of music. But this more obvious example also served notice to me that these possibilities existed within this music, and just maybe there also were elements of the spontaneous compositions that exhibited these features.

 

 

 

This was my intuitive reaction to this song when I first heard it in my formative years as I was still learning how to play, and it is still how I understand it when I listen today. But beyond the more obvious example of this composed melody, I feel that the spontaneous part of this composition, indeed of all of Parker's compositions, are also explanations, and that they are all telling stories. And as mentioned before, they contain the same kinds of exclamations, dialog, linguistic phraseology, and common sense structure that is contained in everyday conversation, with the exception that this linguistic structure is based on the sub-culture of the African-American community of that time, what most people would call slang. This is particularly evident in the rhythm of the musical phrases. The way Max answers the melody is definitely conversational. I hear the same kinds of rhythms that I see when watching certain boxers, basketball players, dancers, and the timing of most of the various activities that go on in the hood. However, this same rhythmic sensibility can occur on various levels of sophistication, and with the music of Bird and his cohorts, it occurs on an extremely sophisticated artistic level.

 

 

   

This subject of musical conversation brings up the issue of African-Diapora DNA. Scholar Schwaller de Lubicz made reference to a theory that the ancient Egyptians, at some very early point in their existence, had a language whose structure and utterances consisted of pure modulated tones similar to music, as opposed to the phonetic languages of today. Given that their ancient writing contained no symbols for vowels, this idea may seem far-fetched. However, because the recorded writing of this civilization documents over two millennia, a great deal of change must have occurred within the language.

 

Many modern linguists believe somewhat the opposite, that the original human languages contained clicks or were predominantly click languages. These linguists use the languages of the Hadza people of Tanzania and Jul'hoan people of Botswana as evidence. However, the evidence of drum languages in the Niger-Congo region of Sub-Saharan Africa tells another story. For example, the drum languages of the Yoruba of Nigeria, Ghana, Togo and Benin; the Ewe of Ghana, Togo and Benin; the Akan of Ghana; and the Dagomba of northern Ghana, still exist today. In the languages of these areas, register tone languages are common, where pitch is used to distinguish words (as opposed to contour, as in Chinese). Since many of these West-African languages are tonal, suprasegmental communication is possible through purely prosodic means (i.e. rhythm, stress and intonation). There is little doubt that emotional prosody (sounds that represent pleasure, surprise, anger, happiness, sadness, etc.) predated the modern concept of languages. If the early ancient Egyptians developed a highly structured form of suprasegmental communication, it is quite possible that de Lubicz' theory is correct. In any case, there is plenty of precedent for the exclusive use of tones as language.

 

Regarding the sections containing spontaneous composition, of course, many musical devices are involved, rhythmic, melodic, harmonic and formal, all on a very high level. Which is why most students of this music are absorbed in the musical parametersthere is so much there. But I propose that much of what is being accomplished musically can be seen more clearly if we take into account the perspective of the African-Diaspora, rather than have discussions primarily about harmonic structure, etc. Many of the rhythms that Parker uses are not merely related to African music in the linguistic sense that I have outlined above, nor only related to the notion of having a certain kind of swing or groove. Also many of the structural rhythmic tendencies of the Diaspora have been retained within African-American culture.

   

 

We can start by looking at the concept of clave in Parker's playing. The phrase at 0:26 of take 1 is precisely the kind of slick musical sentence that Parker was renowned for among his peers. I feel that the emphasis in the phrasing contains rhythmic figures very similar to various clave patterns. This phrase is repeated almost verbatim at 0:55 with the addition of a turn and a slight shift in the clave pattern:  

 

 

 

(at 0:26):

 

 

versus:

 

 

(at 0:55):

 

 

Of course, you need to listen to the recording to get a feel for the emphasis, but my point here is that there does not seem to be much discussion of this aspect of Bird's internal sense of rhythmic structure. Recognition of a sense of clave in Parker's playing is a key (pardon my pun) to beginning to investigate his complex rhythmic concepts in greater detail. It would be instructive to listen to Bird's spontaneous compositions only for their rhythmic content without regard for the pitches. Then it would be revealed that many of his phrases contain the same kinds of rhythmic structures found in the phrasing of the master drummers of West Africa, with the exception of the pitch conception. An investigation of the starting and ending points of Parker's phrases reveals a kinship to these Sub-Saharan drum masters.

 

Take as an example this melodic sentence at 0:38 of take 1 of "Perhaps":

 

 

 

There are several rhythmic shifts of emphasis here that suggest a compressing and lengthening of phrases. Starting on beat 3 of measure 2, the shift in emphasis within the phrase suggests groupings of 6-4-5-3-4 (in quarter note pulses). This concept is similar to the classic mop-mop figure; i.e. 4-3-5-4, and is one of the hallmarks of Bird's spontaneous compositions.

 

Reviewer: Steve Coleman

 

 

Charlie Parker: Perhaps (Take 1)

 

Track: Perhaps (Take 1)

 

Artist: Charlie Parker (alto sax)

 

CD: Complete Savoy & Dial Studio Sessions

( Savoy 17079)

 

 

Musicians: Charlie Parker (alto sax), Miles Davis (trumpet), John Lewis (piano), Curly Russell (bass), Max Roach (drums).

Composed by Charlie Parker.

 

Recorded: New York, September 24 1948

 

 

Diese Komposition ist ein weiteres Beispiel für die vielen linguistischen rhythmischen Bauteile, die Parker in seiner Musik verwendete und die wenig diskutiert werden. Nach meiner Auffassung ist die komponierte Melodie eindeutig eine Erklärung mit Variationen. Die Eröffnungs-Phrase der Melodie ist eine Art Erklärung, gefolgt von „but perhaps“ [aber vielleicht] (beim Übergang in Takt 5), welches die erste alternative Erklärung startet. Dann startet „perhaps“ (in Takt 7 hinein) eine zweite alternative Erklärung. „Perhaps“ (in den Takt 9 hinein) startet die endgültige Aufklärung und dann endet die Melodie in den Takten 11 und 12 mit den Antworten: „perhaps, perhaps, perhaps“. Wir können die melodischen Abschnitte zwischen den „perhaps“ somit als eine Art Diskussion und Aufklärung einer bestimmten Situation verstehen, was der buchstäblichen Aufforderung der Meister, mit seiner Musik immer eine Geschichte zu erzählen, verstärkte Beweiskraft verleiht. In diesem Song wird der Melodie offensichtlich eine lautmalerische Dimension hinzugefügt, die mir immerhin ermöglichte, die musikalische „Perhaps“-Phrase in einem frühen Stadium meiner Karriere, als ich noch sehr wenig über die Struktur der Musik wusste, zu erkennen. Dieses besonders offensichtliche Beispiel ließ mich aber auch erkennen, dass diese Möglichkeiten innerhalb der Musik bestehen und es möglicherweise auch Elemente der spontanen Kompositionen gab, die diese Eigenschaften aufweisen.

 

Das war meine intuitive Reaktion auf diesen Song, als ich ihn zum ersten Mal hörte und ich in meinen Entwicklungsjahren war, in denen ich noch zu spielen lernte - und ich verstehe ihn noch heute so, wenn ich ihn mir anhöre. Abgesehen von diesem besonders offensichtlichen Beispiel dieser komponierten Melodie glaube ich jedoch, dass auch der spontane Teil dieser Komposition - sowie auch aller anderen Kompositionen Parkers – Erklärungen sind und dass sie alle Geschichten erzählen. Und sie enthalten, wie bereits erwähnt, die selben Arten der Ausrufe, des Dialogs, der linguistischen Ausdrucksweise und der Struktur des Alltagsverstandes, wie sie in der Alltags-Konversation enthalten sind, mit der Besonderheit, dass diese linguistische Struktur auf der Sub-Kultur der afro-amerikanischen Community der damaligen Zeit beruht, die die meisten Leute „Slang“ nennen. Das ist besonders in den Rhythmen der musikalischen Phrasen evident. Die Art, wie Max der Melodie antwortet, ist definitiv gesprächsartig. Ich höre die selben Arten von Rhythmen, die ich beim Beobachten von Boxern, Basketball-Spielern, Tänzern und des Timings der meisten der verschiedenen Aktivitäten, die in der Hood [Neighborhood, afro-amerikanische Nachbarschaft] ablaufen, sehe. Diese selbe rhythmische Sensibilität kann jedoch in unterschiedlichen Graden der Verfeinerung [Sophistication] auftreten und in der Musik von Bird und seiner Kollegen tritt sie auf einem extrem verfeinerten künstlerischen Niveau auf.

 

Dieses Thema der musikalischen Konversation bringt das Thema der afrikanischen Diaspora-DNA ins Spiel. Der Gelehrte Schwaller de Lubicz nahm Bezug auf eine Theorie, nach der die alten Ägypter an einem sehr frühen Punkt ihrer Existenz eine Sprache hatten, deren Struktur und Äußerungen aus puren modulierten Tönen bestanden, ähnlich wie Musik – im Gegensatz zu den phonetischen Sprachen von heute. Angesichts der Tatsache, dass ihre alte Schrift keine Symbole für Selbstlaute enthielt, mag diese Idee als weit hergeholt erscheinen. Es muss jedoch - weil die erfasste Schrift dieser Zivilisation es über zwei Jahrtausende belegt - eine große Menge an Veränderung innerhalb der Sprache erfolgt sein.

 

Viele moderne Linguisten glauben mehr oder weniger das Gegenteil: dass die ursprünglichen menschlichen Sprachen Schnalzlaute enthielten oder überwiegend Schnalzlaut-Sprachen waren. Diese Linguisten führen die Sprachen des Hazda-Volkes in Tansania und des Jul'hoan-Volkes in Botswana als Beleg an. Die Evidenz der Trommel-Sprachen in der Niger-Kongo-Region im Sub-Sahara-Afrika erzählt jedoch eine andere Geschichte. Zum Beispiel existieren bis heute die Trommel-Sprachen der Yoruba in Nigeria, Ghana, Togo und Benin; der Ewe in Ghana, Togo und Benin; der Akan in Ghana; und der Dagomba im nördlichen Ghana. In diesen Gegenden sind Tonsprachen gebräuchlich, in denen die Tonhöhe zur Unterscheidung von Worten verwendet wird (im Gegensatz zur Kontur, wie im Chinesischen). Da viele dieser west-afrikanischen Sprachen tonal sind, ist die suprasegmentale Kommunikation mithilfe bloßer prosodischer Mittel (d.h. Rhythmus, Betonung und Intonation) möglich. Es bestehen kaum Zweifel daran, dass emotionale Prosodie (Laute, die Freude, Überraschung, Ärger, Fröhlichkeit, Traurigkeit usw. ausdrücken) dem modernen Konzept der Sprachen vorausging. Wenn die frühen alten Ägypter eine hochgradig strukturierte Form einer suprasegmentalen Kommunikation entwickelt haben, ist es durchaus möglich, dass die Theorie von de Lubicz stimmt. Auf jeden Fall gibt es viele Beispiele für die ausschließliche Verwendung von Tönen als Sprache.

 

Was die Bereiche anbelangt, die die spontane Komposition umfassen, so sind natürlich viele musikalische Bauelemente involviert: rhythmische, melodische, harmonische und formale, alle auf einem sehr hohen Niveau. Deshalb werden die meisten Studenten dieser Musik gänzlich von den musikalischen Parametern in Anspruch genommen – es gibt da so viel. Ich behaupte jedoch, dass viel von dem, was musikalisch ausgeführt wird, klarer gesehen werden kann, wenn wir die Perspektive der afrikanischen Diaspora berücksichtigen, anstatt hauptsächlich über harmonische Strukturen usw. zu diskutieren. Viele der Rhythmen, die Parker verwendete, sind nicht bloß im linguistischen Sinn, den ich oben skizziert habe, mit afrikanischer Musik verwandt, auch nicht bloß durch die Vorstellung von einem gewissen Swing oder Groove: Auch viele der strukturellen rhythmischen Tendenzen der Diaspora sind innerhalb der afro-amerikanischen Kultur bewahrt worden.

 

Wir können beginnen, indem wir uns das Konzept der Clave in Parkers Spiel ansehen. Die Phrase bei 0:26 des Take 1 ist genau die Art von raffiniertem musikalischem Satz, für die Parker unter seinen Kollegen bekannt war. Nach meinem Empfinden enthält die Betonung in der Phrasierung rhythmische Figuren, die sehr ähnlich wie verschiedene Clave-Muster sind. Diese Phrase wird fast wortwörtlich bei 0:55 wiederholt mit einer zusätzlichen Wendung und einer geringfügigen Veränderung im Clave-Muster:

 

 

 

(at 0:26):

 

 

versus:

 

 

(at 0:55):

 

Man muss natürlich die Aufnahme selbst anhören, um ein Gefühl für die Betonung zu bekommen. Mein Argument ist hier jedoch, dass es nicht viel Diskussion zu diesem Aspekt von Birds internem Sinn für rhythmische Struktur gibt. Das Erkennen eines Sinnes für die Clave in Parkers Spiel ist ein Schlüssel (entschuldigen Sie mein Wortspiel [Clave: spanisch Schlüssel]) zur detaillierteren Untersuchung seines komplexen rhythmischen Konzepts. Es ist aufschlussreich, Birds spontane Kompositionen nur hinsichtlich ihres rhythmischen Inhalts, ohne Beachtung der Tonhöhen, anzuhören. Dann wird offensichtlich, dass viele seiner Phrasen die selbe Art rhythmischer Strukturen enthalten, die in der Phrasierung der Meister-Trommler West-Afrikas zu finden sind – mit Ausnahme der Tonhöhen-Konzeption. Eine Untersuchung der Start- und End-Punkte von Parkers Phrasen offenbaren eine Verwandtschaft zu diesen Sub-Sahara-Trommel-Meistern.

 

Siehe zum Beispiel diesen melodischen Satz bei 0:38 des Take 1 von "Perhaps":

 

 

Es gibt hier etliche rhythmische Verschiebungen der Betonung, die den Eindruck einer Verdichtung und Verlängerung der Phrasen vermitteln. Die beim Beat 3 des Taktes 2 beginnende Verschiebung der Betonung innerhalb der Phrase deutet eine Gruppierung in 6-4-5-3-4 an (in einem Viertel-Noten-Puls). Dieses Konzept ist ähnlich wie die klassische Mop-Mop-Figur, d.h. 4-3-5-4, und ist eines der Kennzeichen von Birds spontanen Kompositionen.

 

Rezensent: Steve Coleman

 

 

Zurück zum Inhaltsverzeichnis von Coleman über Parker

 

 

Kontakt / Offenlegung